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  • This book interprets our natural surroundings in a way that enhances a simple walk in the scenic deciduous woodlands of the Ozark Mountain region. Explanations go beyond trees and their habitat to include other diverse subjects: the leaf litter beneath a hiker’s feet, strategies used by wildflowers for pollination and seed dispersal, diseases that can ravage our forests, and forces active in the landscape that impact conservation efforts. Simplified line drawings demonstrate specific points of interest in a way that visually cluttered photographs cannot do. Includes: 163 line drawings, a list of species used in the text, a glossary, and a reading list.
  • The highly anticipated second edition of the Buffalo River Handbook, written by Kenneth L. Smith, updates and expands the first edition initially published in 2004. The new edition includes the recently completed 28-mile segment of the Buffalo River Trail from U.S. Hwy 65 (Grinder’s Ferry) to AR Hwy 14 (Dillard’s Ferry) along the Buffalo National River in north Arkansas. Updates and revisions throughout the book describe the current setting with respect to campsite information and amenities, status of historic structures, and geologic conditions of the river and trails. Ken Smith—conservationist, park planner, and the designer and construction supervisor of most of the eighty miles of the Buffalo River Trail—brings to light in this edition his discerning engineer’s intellect, his photographer’s eye, his love for the outdoors as well as the people and land of the Ozarks and the Buffalo National River, and his passion for the protection and active exploration of our natural resources. An inductee into the Arkansas Tourism Hall of Fame in 2017 for his conservation efforts, Smith offers a three-part guide to the river, complete with maps, diagrams and photographs: insights on geology, wildlife, plants, Native Americans, pioneers, and the history of the development of the Buffalo River as the first National river; a detailed guide describing the entire 146-mile length of the river itself; and a guide for over 150 miles of hiking trails. The Buffalo River Handbook, 2nd edition, is a comprehensive reference encyclopedia, a trail and float guide, and a cultural history of the area of north Arkansas that encompasses the Buffalo River—a jewel in the crown of undammed, free-flowing rivers in Arkansas and the nation.
  • Arkansas Butterflies and Moths, 2nd edition, includes 264 species of butterflies and moths found in Arkansas.  Species identification is facilitated through detailed text entries alongside 300 full-sized color photographs. And, for the first time ever, all butterfly species in the state are included. Many live photographs and shots of larvae are used, and butterfly gardening and prime butterfly-watching locations in the state are covered.

  • This beautiful color illustrated book provides a clear, concise way for children to identify Arkansas’s state butterfly, the Diana Fritillary, in its natural habitat by Lori A. Spencer. It features 28 color photographs, drawings, and other resources for children, parents, and social studies teachers.

  • Under the auspices of the 1938 Flood Control Act, the U.S. Corps of Engineers began to pursue an aggressive dam-building campaign. A grateful public generally lauded their efforts, but when they turned their attention to Arkansas’s Buffalo River, the vocal opposition their proposed projects generated dumbfounded them. Never before had anyone challenged the Corps’ assumption that damming a river was an improvement. Led by Neil Compton, a physician in Bentonville, Arkansas, a group of area conservationists formed the Ozark Society to join the battle for the Buffalo. This book is the account of this decade-long struggle that drew in such political figures as U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, Senator J. William Fulbright, and Governor Orval Faubus. The battle finally ended in 1972 with President Richard Nixon’s designation of the Buffalo as the first national river. Drawing on hundreds of personal letters, photographs, maps, newspaper articles, and reminiscences, Compton’s lively book details the trials, gains, setbacks, and ultimate triumph in one of the first major skirmishes between environmentalists and developers.

  • Complete revision of The Buffalo National River Canoeing Guide, this is the 4th revised edition of this classic guide, done by members of the Ozark Society, dedicated to Harold and Margaret Hedges. This guide includes all aspects of the Buffalo River experience, including safety tips, equestrian trails, the GPS Coordinates for points along the river, and topographic maps and narrative river logs.
  • This map, first published by Trails Illustrated in 1992-93, uses USGS topographic maps as a base. T.I. has added hiking and horse trails, roads, campgrounds, and other features not shown on the 1960s vintage USGS maps. Also shown are routes of access to river and wilderness, and floaters’ car shuttle routes. Map users will find it easy to calculate the mileage of any trail hike or river trip and will see information for hikers, floaters, horseback riders, for anyone wanting to explore the Buffalo. The map is printed in four colors on waterproof, tear-proof plastic. Map design and text are by Ken Smith, author of Buffalo River Handbook and The Buffalo River Country, with cooperation from the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service. This map includes the Leatherwood and Lower Buffalo Wilderness Areas.
  • This map, first published by Trails Illustrated in 1992-93, uses USGS topographic maps as a base. T.I. has added hiking and horse trails, roads, campgrounds and other features not shown on the 1960s vintage USGS maps. The map includes routes of access to river and wilderness, and floaters’ car shuttle routes, and map users will find it easy to calculate the mileage of any trail hike or river trip. Included is a list of day hikes graded by difficulty and information for hikers, floaters, horseback riders, for anyone wanting to explore the Buffalo. This map is printed in four colors on waterproof, tear-proof plastic. Map design and text are by Ken Smith, author of Buffalo River Handbook and The Buffalo River Country, with cooperation from the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service.
  • Still on the Hill builds on their reputation as ‘ambassadors of the Ozarks’ with this collection of story songs of the Buffalo River. The river was scheduled to be dammed in the late 60s but a state-wide uprising prevented this fate and it became our nation’s first historic river--a National Park to flow free for all time. Still a River celebrates this pristine river and its rich treasure trove of stories in the form of song. This folk duo comprised of Kelly and Donna Mulhollan have deep Ozark roots and both are powerful instrumentalists, vocalists, and songwriters. They have been recognized by the State of Arkansas for their work and received the Governor’s Folk Life Award in 2009. This project was funded by the Buffalo River Watershed Alliance, the Ozark Society, and the community of NW Arkansas. Release Date: 2016
  • These wonderfully detailed and beautifully printed photographs are about people's adventures and discoveries: The Buffalo River and its towering bluffs, its side canyons with hidden waterfalls, its natural bridges, historic places, and more. For those who have been there, the book brings great memories. Been there or not, it can inspire you to learn more. In his essay, John Heuston tells how these photographs became powerful weapons in historic battles to keep the Buffalo River and other wonders from being spoiled. The book’s nearly 100 photographs are reproduced by the same duotone process employed for the finest books of photographic art. 96 pages, hardbound, 9½ x 10.
  • The Buffalo Flows is a one-hour documentary film written and produced by two-time Emmy award winning filmmaker Larry Foley, Professor of Journalism at the University of Arkansas. The film is narrated by Academy Award winner Ray McKinnon, an actor and film director who calls Little Rock home. Trey Marley of Fayetteville does a masterful job of capturing the river's magnificent beauty over four seasons, while Emmy Award winning documentary filmmaker Dale Carpenter, also a professor at the U of A, lends his talent as the film's editor. "This story is like the old song, 'Big Rock Candy Mountain.' There's not just one thing that makes the Buffalo so special—so unique," said Foley. "When the 'Battle for the Buffalo' was won, protecting the river from being dammed, we saved a national, natural treasure.”
  • In 1967, Ken Smith’s Buffalo River Country introduced the general public to the Buffalo River in northern Arkansas. The book is richly illustrated with photos and drawings and is divided into three sections: the river, the land, and Smith’s vision for protecting the river. Throughout the several printings of the book, Smith provided updates on the status of the proposed legislation to keep the river undammed and free-flowing—legislation which, in 1972, established the river as the Buffalo National River—the first National river in the U.S.